On-line porn addict paid a high price

October 9, 2014 | By More

Court House-Sept-2013-05An on-line porn addict paid a high price – loss of most support from family and friends – when he told them he was being prosecuted for possession of thousands of images of child abuse pornography.

Robert John Kilkolly, a 46-year-old business analyst, has also been suspended at his work pending sentencing, and will suffer the naming and shaming that follows his Christchurch District Court sentencing.

He sent a email with an objectionable image to a person he thought was a 14-year-old girl. He actually sent the image to an undercover Department of Internal Affairs inspector, and in the search that followed Kilkolly was found in possession of 4400 images.

Judge Gary MacAskill was told that the image he sent was categorised as the lowest level 1 of child pornography, involving posing, but the images he possessed ranged up to the most serious 4 and 5 level pictures depicting abuse.

Judge MacAskill decided that a home detention sentence could be substituted for a jail term, after Kilkolly admitted one distribution charge and 11 charges of possessing objectionable publications. He imposed a nine month term, with six further months of post-sentence conditions.

It amounts to 15 months when Kilkolly will have to take treatment as directed, and have no access to the Internet or electronic storage devices. He lives alone, and has little support. He will also have to do 200 hours of community work.

Prosecutor Heather McKenzie said Kilkolly had been accessing pornography for eight years, and had been active in “on-line communities”. The images depicted girls aged nine to 18 years, and boys aged six to 12 years.

Defence counsel James Rapley said Kilkolly had co-operated fully, and his admissions about the prosecution had had very real consequences with the loss of support of most family and friends. He had already begun psychological treatment for his addiction. He was remorseful and embarrassed and accepted he needed treatment. He was glad he had been caught.

Judge MacAskill considered whether Kilkolly might be a bad candidate for a home detention sentence because he had continued his on-line activities after a police warning in 2006, and even after the offending again came to light with the more recent search and interview by Internal Affairs investigators. Kilkolly set up a new on-line profile and continued to offend.

Judge MacAskill said the aggravating features were the ages of the children, the number of victims, the nature of the sexual acts depicted, and the long period over which possession occurred.

But after hearing submissions, he took into account Kilkolly’s steps towards rehabilitation, his co-operation, his guilty pleas, and his strong work ethic, and granted home detention at a Christchurch address.

All the material is to be destroyed and computer gear used has been forfeited.

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